Collection Management Facility – Lists for review

As part of the Fiat Lux project, the McGill Library will be transferring a significant portion of the print collection in the Humanities and Social Sciences Library to a new storage facility. Space for 500,000 items will be available when the new library is completed, with the rest held remotely and available by request within a delay of 24 hours.

In order to ensure that both recent and highly used materials remain physically on campus, the library has produced a list of items that meet either of the following criteria:

  • Books published within the last 10 years
  • Books borrowed within the last 5 years

This list will serve as a first draft as we work towards the final list of material to remain on campus. Circulation history is the most reliable indicator that an item will be used again, therefore users would benefit overall from previously borrowed material staying on campus.

We understand that recency and loan history alone may not identify material that some of our users rely on in ways that placement in storage would negatively affect. Therefore, we are seeking input from faculty and students in order to identify any material that does not meet the above criteria, but which nevertheless would be beneficial to remain on campus for practical research or teaching needs.

To view the lists, and to make any requests for individual items to stay on campus, please visit the web page dedicated to the project.

This exercise will continue through the Winter 2021 semester, with the final lists compiled at the end of May.

If you have any questions, please contact us.

The 2020 Cundill History Prize Shortlist

Each year the Cundill Prize, administered by McGill University and selected by an international jury, recognizes the book the “embodies historical scholarship, originality, literary quality and broad appeal.” It is the most lucrative prize of its kind, with winners receiving an award of US$75,000 and two runners-up receiving US$10,000.

To highlight the achievements of these authors, the Humanities and Social Sciences Library has put together a virtual book display showcasing the ten shortlisted books for this year’s prize:

Roderick Beaton, Greece: Biography of a Modern Nation
Vincent Brown, Tacky’s Revolt: the Story of an Atlantic Slave War
William Dalrymple, The Anarchy: the Relentless Rise of the East India Company
Richard M. Eaton, India in the Persianate Age: 1000-1765
Kim Ghattas, Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran and the Rivalry that Unravelled the Middle East
Kerri Greenidge, Black Radical: the Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter
Rashid Khalidi, The Hundred Years’ War on Palestine: a History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017
Paul Lay, Providence Lost: the Rise and Fall of Cromwell’s Protectorate
Claudio Saunt, Unworthy Republic: the Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory
Camilla Townsend, Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs

Visit the display and borrow one of our ebooks!

The Cundill History Prize Exhibition

Julia Lovell has won the 2019 Cundill History Prize for her book, Maoism: A Global History (The Bodley Head, Knopf).

Each year the Cundill Prize, administered by McGill University and selected by an international jury, recognizes the book the “embodies historical scholarship, originality, literary quality and broad appeal.” It is the most lucrative prize of its kind, with winners receiving an award of US$75,000 and two runners-up receiving US$10,000.

To highlight the achievements of these authors, the Humanities and Social Sciences Library has put on an exhibition on the main floor of the Redpath Library Building showcasing the eight shortlisted books for this year’s prize:

  • Julia Lovell, Maoism: A Global History (Winner)
  • Mary Fulbrook, Reckonings: Legacies of Nazi Persecution and the Quest for Justice (Finalist)
  • Jill Lepore, These Truths: A History of the United States (Finalist)
  • Sunil Amrit, Unruly Waters: How Rains, Rivers, Coasts, and Seas Have Shaped Asia’s History
  • Helen Berry, Orphans of Empire: The Fate of London’s Foundlings
  • David Blight, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom
  • Toby Green, A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution
  • Victoria Johnson, American Eden: David Hosack, Botony, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic

Accompanying the exhibition is a display of library copies of this year’s nominees and past finalists that readers can borrow.