New Redpath book display: Climate change and the Anthropocene – Don’t lose hope!

Climate change is absolutely the issue of our times. Right now, Australia’s burning, the Amazon’s burning, Siberia’s burning. Indonesia’s drowning. There are avalanches and floods in Pakistan. In Canada, we’ve seen extreme fire seasons in the west, flooding in the east, the Arctic sea ice at its lowest in the satellite record. At the same time, we’re experiencing the world’s sixth mass extinction, and this one’s because of us.

This month’s book display offers a look at the extent of the problem, and because that can leave you feeling hopeless, we’ve included plenty of books on making change. Have a look, borrow a book, get active.

If you’d like to consult the book list, you can find it here.

You’ll find the book display in its usual place, but the books on book trucks while we await our fancy new book display shelving.

New Quiet Pods: Thanks PGSS!

Filling a need, once again, thanks to funding from the PGSS Library Improvement Fund, the Humanities and Social Sciences Library has just received two new “Quiet Pods”.

Students in search of a silent room to hold a private telephone call, web conference or job interview have two new spaces to try in HSSL.

The pods are soundproof. They have power in their shelf, and a light and fan for circulation that turns on as soon as the pod is occupied.

 

The pods were designed and built by Framery, an award-winning office design firm in Finland. The Framery O pod is constructed with sustainably sourced materials. The pods are echo-free and provide a comfortable working environment for one, that includes access to McGill’s wireless network.

Located on the main floor (M1) of the McLennan Library building, adjacent the Recently received – newspapers and journals shelves, the pods are currently available without a booking. Be sure to send us your feedback, once you have tried one.

The Cundill History Prize Exhibition

Julia Lovell has won the 2019 Cundill History Prize for her book, Maoism: A Global History (The Bodley Head, Knopf).

Each year the Cundill Prize, administered by McGill University and selected by an international jury, recognizes the book the “embodies historical scholarship, originality, literary quality and broad appeal.” It is the most lucrative prize of its kind, with winners receiving an award of US$75,000 and two runners-up receiving US$10,000.

To highlight the achievements of these authors, the Humanities and Social Sciences Library has put on an exhibition on the main floor of the Redpath Library Building showcasing the eight shortlisted books for this year’s prize:

  • Julia Lovell, Maoism: A Global History (Winner)
  • Mary Fulbrook, Reckonings: Legacies of Nazi Persecution and the Quest for Justice (Finalist)
  • Jill Lepore, These Truths: A History of the United States (Finalist)
  • Sunil Amrit, Unruly Waters: How Rains, Rivers, Coasts, and Seas Have Shaped Asia’s History
  • Helen Berry, Orphans of Empire: The Fate of London’s Foundlings
  • David Blight, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom
  • Toby Green, A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution
  • Victoria Johnson, American Eden: David Hosack, Botony, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic

Accompanying the exhibition is a display of library copies of this year’s nominees and past finalists that readers can borrow.