The MAP Project – Montreal historical geographic information

 The MAP Project :“Montréal, l’avenir du passé” (Montréal, The Future of the Past)

When you need a break from your summer Montreal walkabouts, consider exploring from your armchair, the MAP Project website.

MAP is an open historical and geographic map portal which allows you to view what Montreal and Montrealers looked like at the turn of the 19th century. The site cross references Montreal maps made by C.E. Goad in 1881 and 1912, with information from the 1881 and 1901 Canadian censuses and layers on other microdata sets (tax rolls, Lovell’s Directories of Montreal businesses).

The site is designed to guide your exploration. Open Bird’s Eye View to view thematic maps for 1881 and 1901 and compare socioeconomic variables.

Interested in how Montrealers made a living or where most of the tavern owners lived? Looking for the Action lets you discover the spatial distribution of occupations and explore street clusters to see how Montreal has changed over time.

Passing Through superimposes the 1921 Goad atlas over a current Google street map. Find your home and see what was there in 1921.

The MAP Project began in 2000 and has involved many contributors. The project has been overseen by Robert Sweeny, a historian at Memorial University of Newfoundland, and Sherry Olson, a geographer at McGill University. Since 2015, the CIEQ has  developed the visualization techniques needed to bring the entire geobase online and the site is now one of many on Espace CIEQ .

 

Asian Heritage Month Book Display

May has been the Heritage Month in recent years in North America. It celebrates the culture, traditions, and history of Asian Americans in the United States and Canada.

May is a time to reflect on the contributions that Canadians of Asian origin continue to make, to the growth and prosperity of Canada. Canadians are invited to take part in the events that honour the legacy of Canadians of Asian origin who, throughout Canadian history, have done so much to make Canada the culturally diverse, compassionate and prosperous nation we know today.

Asian Heritage Month has been celebrated across Canada since the 1990s. In December 2001, the Senate of Canada adopted a motion proposed by Senator Vivienne Poy to officially designate May as Asian Heritage Month in Canada. In May 2002, the Government of Canada signed an official declaration to designate May as Asian Heritage Month. (The above information is from the Government of Canada’s website.)

There is a Asian Heritage Month book display in the Redpath Library during the whole month of May this year. The display features books on Asia or by Asian authors. You’ll find books on various topics such as Asian cinema, sports, entertainments, history, literature, religion, as well as encyclopedia on Asian American history and culture. You can find books by well known Asian Canadians including Joy Kogawa, Canadian poet and novelist; Jen Sookfong Lee, a Chinese Canadian broadcaster and novelist; Vivienne Poy, historian, fashion designer, community volunteer, and senator (1998-2012).

 

Please take a look at these books, and check out one or two of them for your reading.

Why not study on a bike? New bicycle desks in Redpath

Now that spring is here and the roads are cycle ready, our thoughts turn to long bike rides in the sunshine! 

Now you can do that while studying, on the new bicycle desks just installed in the Redpath Library.

A pilot project brought to students by Exercise is Medicine (EIMC@McGill).  Jointly founded in early 2014, by McGill Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Kinesiology students, this group is reaching out with events and initiatives on campus focusing on student wellness and activity, helping to make exercise a key part of the McGill education and experience.

The group has raised money for two FitDesks and you are now able to try them out in the Library, as you finish off coursework and study this term. Be sure to take a few moments to offer your feedback on the FitDesks!