Communicating Science: Profile of Sierra Clark by Audrey Carleton

Today we have a guest student post, originally submitted as a class assignment for Communicating Science (CCOM 314). With support from Diane Dechief, Faculty Lecturer at the McGill Writing Centre, we will be sharing more noteworthy student writing right here on The Turret.

Audrey Carleton chose to write a profile on Sierra Clark, a graduate student supervised by Dr. Jill Baumgartner in the Institute for Health and Social Policy.


Sierra Clark

Headline: Sierra Clark on indoor air pollution and academic uncertainty

Subhead: McGill Master’s student tests lifesaving interventions for Tibetan Plateau residents

By: Audrey Carleton

Date: December 1, 2017

Sierra Clark has been reading National Geographic for as long as she can remember. Even before she learned to read, she would eagerly flip through the magazine’s glossy pages to admire its photos. From this young age, she had her sights set on someday working for the publication as an archaeologist.

In the twenty years that followed, Clark had a few changes of heart. When she began her undergraduate degree at McGill University in 2011, she was enrolled with a major in Anthropology. But after sitting through a few convoluted lectures in an introductory anthropology course, she realized the program wasn’t the right fit for her. One meeting with an academic advisor later, she settled on a major in Geography, and swiftly fell in love with it. Upon graduating in 2015, she swiftly enrolled in a Master’s Program in Epidemiology at McGill, which she is completing now. All the while, Clark continued to read National Geographic religiously. Continue reading

America’s 100 Best Adventures

americanadvanturesHave you finished your exams and are you planning your summer trips? If so, you will probably find this article useful. National Geographic recently created a list of 100 most appealing adventure places in the States where you might be able to enjoy your favorite activities in pure nature.

If you decide to visit several places on one trip, you may draw your itinerary using this interactive map.

If you cannot go to any of these sites this summer,  you can at least play fun puzzles by creating one of these famous natural beauties.

Read more on National Geographic.

Image: America’s Best Adventures Maps from National Geographic

Ten tips for a GIS job interview

interviewApril is a busy month when you are wrapping up your studies and planning your summer activities. For those of you who are preparing for a job interview in the GIS field, I would like to share the following tips from GIS Lounge.

  1. Volunteer
  2. Create a portfolio
  3. Research the GIS job you are interviewing for
  4. Don’t rush to answer
  5. Project the right body language
  6. Make sure to highlight your experiences
  7. Demonstrate your ability to work collaboratively
  8. Be positive
  9. Show an interest in your prospective place of employment
  10. Show your passion

For details of these tips, please read here.

Image credits to Microsoft Images.

Pledge for H2O

As humans, we all need water. The ecosystems of Earth need water too. Unfortunately, many rivers run dry from overuse. If you don’t want to see this happen, one of the things you can do is save the water that you consume every day. Here are some tips. You can also take the pledge at Change the Course to help restore the Colorado River. Every pledge will return 1,000 gallons to this river.

If you are interested in learning more about freshwater and why it is so important to the world, I would recommend National Geographic’s Freshwater 101 to start your research.

McGill videos on YouTube and iTunesU

I like posting videos in The Turret, like Minute Physics, TED Talks, and old scientific communication videos (I’m starting to think that I watch a lot of videos), but thus far I have neglected to talk about those created right here at McGill.

For example, in this video from the Soup & Science series Prof. Lehner from Geography poses the question: how much water do you use per day?

Videos from students and researchers are available on McGill’s YouTube channel or iTunesU (this link will launch iTunes).

Happy viewing!

Journeys into Geography

This year I’ve spent a lot of time at Department of Geography and the Geographic Information Center on the 5th floor of Burnside Hall. While helping students find maps, data, and literature, I received a common question from people outside of Geography. That was, “I am not quite interested in my subject and this [the application of GIS data and software to her research] makes it exciting…Should I switch to Geography?” I am not a geographer, so I cannot tell you exactly what a geographer does and what makes this profession appealing. However, I was lucky enough to come across the following video which might be able to answer your question.